(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The Tattler"

19-2^ 



M'Msms^m^ 










^is^sw^!^m!Mm^^mK '^^m iMM^mM^iM^^m^mm:itsm^ 



-'J 



,':SSs«^lgS^s 






^.y./ 



tW €.J\ 










\; 



f 



. .* ,^S5 



Cȣ' 



f 



-./•^ 






■;-.a<^!A»;^i: 






5S 
I 

i 
i 
i 
i 
i 

i 
i 

i 

1 



I 
I 
I 

i 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 

i. 



XlX presenting this fourth issue of 
the Tattler to the public, the 

^^ Board of Editors wishes to thank 
the advertisers and all others who have 
so kindly contributed to its success. 



I- \iir\^ rPiT rriT rrit t At rrnTAt rrn mt mt rrit t At t Ai ? Ai t at iriT r At irn r At irit tPh im rPit r At rriB 






BOARD OF EDITORS 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

ElCHARD F. MaNWELL 

ASSISTANT EDITORS 

Barry Gray '26 Frederick Sampson '26 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

Alumni Robert Tetro '27 

Athletics Eichard Merritt '27 

Jokes Helen Merritt '27 

BUSINESS MANAGER 

Richard Bissell '26 



CONTENTS 



Foreword 

Deuicatiox 

Senior Class 

Class Day Exercises 

Class Roll 

Editorial 

LlTERARY 

Atu letics 
Class of 1927 
Class of 1928 
Class of 1929 
Alumxi Notes 
Debating 
Class Grinds 



1 
3 

5 
8 
12 
13 
14 
23 
24 
26 
28 
29 
30 
31 



0[ljxs iSBue of t\}t 3[attler ih 
gratefully lichuateb to 
tlje ntEmnrii nf 

Mtsfi 5li2abctlj i>}jelltttan 



k 



r 



!■ 



■< 



'J 



A 



J. 



iU, 





RICHARD MEREDITH BISSELL 

''Dick" 

Class Secretary and Treasurer (4), Business 
Manager of Taftlei- (4), Baseball (4). 
The jewel of the Senior class, at least he is 
always sparkling with wit and humor. At a 
recent debate Richard Meredith was so digni- 
fied that at first he refused to sit on the same 
platform with his colleagues. Can you imagine 
that? He has recently acquired a side-kick. 
Lean over closer while I whisper, ''It's only 
his collegiate Ford — Henry." "Remember the 
Maine. ' ' It blew up ! 



MARGUERITE BRIDGMAN PORNIER 

'•Peg" 

"None are so good but that they could be 
better." Such is Marguerite's motto and she 
has tried faithfully to carry it out ever since 
her Freshman year when she refused to recite 
in General Science, after disproving all the 
laws of physics, past and present. "Never put 
off till tomorrow Avhat you can do today." 





BARRY OSGOOD GRAY 

"Rainy" 
Baseball (3 & 4), Basketball (4), Soccer (3), 

Member Executive Committee of Debating 
Society (4). 

This is Haydenville's contribution to our 
Senior class. Last but not least, he joined us 
in his Sophomore year and has been trying to 
catch up with the rest of the lively (?) 
Seniors ever since. You should see the way he 
takes down the bleachers when he strikes out 
"Laugh and the world laughs with you." His 
motto? Nix. 



MILTON ADDISON HOWES 

''Mit" 
Basketball (4), Soccer (3), Baseball (3), (4), 
Executive Committee of Debating Society (4). 
"Mit" is our "Greatest American." At 
least his great, great grandfather played tennis 
with John Milton, the blind poet, at the Battle 
of Waterloo. Hence his present name. He 
takes a lively interest in "Studes. " Don't 
confuse this Avith studies. Nope ! He is no 
bachelor, being engaged three times already, 
so step lively girls. 

"Old Faithful" 




ELIZABETH MAE KEMPKES 

"Bessie" 
Class President (2), Secretary of the Debating 
Society (3) (4). 
Bessie is one of the two belles who remain 
in the class. She was heart-broken when her 
old pal "Vick}^" left for the "wild and woolly 
West." She is noted for her ability to attract 
the young men and to translate French and 
Cicero. We sincerely regret, however, that 
owing to illness, she has been unable to be 
with us the last three months, and for that 
same reason we are forced to omit her picture. 
We understand that Dick Manwell has a 
grudge against her for making him do all the 
reciting in Senior French and "math" class. 
"Where there's a will, there's a way." 



■■1 


PV^^H 


^H 


Ei»,^^^II^^H 


^^s 


^^^L 


^^Pi 


■m^ ^^^1 


^^Ht~. 




^^^H ' 


i^^^^^i 


H^K 


^^^^M 


^^^■f 


^ ...isix- j^^^m 


^^^K. 


,,^|^^^H 


1 


^^ '^^^^^^^^^^l^^^^l 



RICHAED FRANKLIN MANWELL 
"Dick'" 
Business Manager of Tattler (3), Vice-Presi- 
dent of Class (3), Vice-President of Debating 
Society (4), Class President (4), 
Editor of Tattler (4). 
Dick has one very peculiar habit, so mark 
him well. He tries to aggravate Miss Dunphy 
by appearing just after the ringing of the last 
bell. So far he has succeeded all too well. This 
ambitious young man is the class grind, one 
would infer such anyway from the animated 
manner in which he recites American History. 
(For further reference see any Senior). 
"It is true, is it not?" 



THE TATTLER 



FREDERICK SHEPARD SAMPSON 
"Sammy" 

Class President (3), Vice-President (4), Soccer 
Captain (3), Baseball ^Manager (4), Basketball 
Manager (4), Baseball (2), (3), (4), Secretary 
and Treasurer A. A. (4), Chairman Executive 
Committee Debating Society (4), Basketball 
(3), (4\ Second Basketball Team (2), Soccer 
(3), Assistant Editor Tattler (4). 

This meek, unobtrusive, little felloAv joined 
us in his Sophomore year. His chief charac- 
teristics are read}' humor and a laugh. Age — 
unknown. Best study — Human nature. Ambi- 
tions — Prize fighter and a diploma. Best sport 
— Croquet. Bravest deed — Making Miss Dun- 
phj^ smile. We are probabh^ as sorry to see 
hihi go as he is to leave us. We thought he 
was a bachelor but after Junior-Senior. Well, 
one has a right to change his mind, doncha 
know? 

"Still Water Runs Deep." 




THE TATTLER 




rm 



VIV 



It was a beautiful Antumu morniug, 
the birds Avere chirping gleefully and 
our hearts were as light as the balmy 
air around us when we, the beginning 
of that fine old class of '26, entered our 
.new Alma Mater. Little Ave dreamed 
of the long hard years of study Avhieh 
lay before us. And as Ave tAvelve (Alas, 
where are they all noAV?) proudly 
trooped through the halls. Avords. so 
stern that they startled each of us into 
instant attention, came to our ears 
from somcAvhere in the upper regions : 
■"Xo running on the stairs"' and again 
'"Xo loitering in the halls." L'pon 
looking up Ave saAv that the speaker 
Avas none other than Miss Dunphy. 
Having registered and reeeiA^ed our 
books, Ave Avere allowed to leaA'e and 
the remainder of the morning Avas 
spent in the "Ole SAvimmin" hole." 

The next day school began in earn- 
est. We poor Freshmen. hoAveA^er, 
Avere soon lost in the maze and Avere 
constantly finding ourseh-es in the 
Avrong room. Whereupon Ave Avould 
shamefacedly adjourn to another room. 

We Avere first ushered into Miss 
Toole's austere presence under Avhose 
gaze all our mischieA'Ous intentions 
fled. Even ''Sid" Bartlett lost his 
habitual grin and "Jib" Goodwin and 
■■Jerry" Rood forgot their amusing 
tricks. 

Xext came Miss Merrifield's kind 
advice and Ave Avere introtiuced to the 
"Ancient J\Iariner" Avith Avhom Ave 
soon became quite intimate. 

Those of us Avho took Latin. hoAv- 
ever soon discoA-ered (much to our 



sorroAv) that there Avas at least one 
subject in school that could not be 
bluffed. 

But our most interesting period came 
under Mr. Ralph Johnson's lofty (six- 
feet-four) mien. Here "Jerry" Rood 
and ■■Jib" GoodAvin excelled and 
"Jerry" soon discovered Mr. Johnson 
could pitch Avith some speed. 

The next feAv Aveeks Avere ones of 
Avorry for there Avere rumors of the 
dreadful things coming to us at the 
Freshman Reception. But after the 
event. Ave Avere pleased to discover that 
there Avere no broken bones and fcAv 
bruises resulted. 

The rest of the year Avas uneventful 
until commencement aaTicu the dignified 
Seniors left us to go their several Avays 
in the great business of life. 

The next year Ave reentered high 
school, but someAvhat smaller in num- 
bers. ■•Sid" Bartlett. Albert Allaire, 
"Jerry" Rood. John Graves, and Elsie 
Dausereau Avere missing. 

The Freshmen that entered this year 
seemed to us more like a delegation 
from some kindergarten getting ac- 
([uainted Avith high school than an 
actual part of it. This year Mr. John- 
son's place Avas filled by Mr. Clough. 

One day Ave Avere surprised to find a 
ncAv lad in our class, Avho introduced 
himself as the great and renoAvned 
Fred Sampson of Chesterfield. We soon 
discovered, hoAVCA'er, that in spite of 
his rustic appearance he Avas a valuable 
addition to the class, and he soon 
proA'ed his literary poAvers. 

We Avere more surprised, though, 



THE TATTLER 



when a young lad. wandering about the 
building as though lost, informed us 
that he was looking for the Sophomore 
class. "We qliickly told him where to 
find it and, ever since then Barry Gray 
has been an important member of the 
class. 

This year, the one thing of note 
Avhich happened (aside from gradua- 
tion) was our "Wa.shington's Birthday 
party which everyone agreed was a 
great success. 

We were especially sorry to see the 
class of '24 graduate for it marked the 
close of one of the best athletic years 
W. H. S. has ever seen. 

When we returned the following 
September as dignified? Juniors we 
noted several changes. Mr. Clough's 
place was filled by Mr. Cleon Johnson 
and Miss Toole 's by Miss Helen Pratt. 
We also noted the absence of our 
former secretary and treasurer for 
Helen Clark had evidently decided 
that N. C. C. suited her better than 
W. H. S. 

This year, we were eligible to the 
Debating Society and the natural re- 
sult was many interesting and exciting- 
debates. But one of the principal 
events of the year was the Junior- 
Senior prom to which we Juniors 
looked forward with great interest 
since it was the first in Avhich we could 
take part. 

Graduation of the class of '25 was 
also of special interest to us this year 
for we kneAv that the next one would 
be ours. Then, too, we can never for- 
get the loads of laurel with which we 
helped in decorating the hall and the 
labor spent in lettering their motto. 

At last our Senior year began and 
our hearts were even gayer than in the 
Freshman year to think that this year 
would mark the completion of our high 
school career. Yet our joy was not 



unmixed with a certain sadness for we 
realized that this year would also mark 
the completion of four of the happiest 
years of our life, for we shall never 
forget the times spent at our dear old 
Alma Mater. 

This year Mr. Cleon Johnson's place 
was filled by Mr. Bauer and Miss 
Pratt 's by Mrs. Warner. 

We .sustained the loss of another 
Senior when "Bessie" Kempkes, a 
faithful and popular member of the 
class, was taken ill with appendicitis. 
Although she was unable to appear at 
our graduation, she will always be 
■'one of us." 

The Junior Senior Prom, this year, 
Avas unusually successful. Much of its 
success, however, was undoubtedly due 
to the winter dancing school. 

Following the prom the days flew 
by rapidly for each was full of work 
in preparation for the coming events. 
We could not help, however, feeling a 
certain dread as the days approached 
for. as it 's true that ' ' Many hands make 
light Avork, " it is also true that "fcAv 
hands make heaA^y Avork" and our class 
Avas never noted for taking pleasure 
in this particular kind of Avork. 

Yet, despite our small number Avhich 
has dAA'indled to six. Ave carried on and 
recognized at last the truth of our 
motto, "Not EA'ening but Dawn." 
Richard F. MauAvell '26. 



PROPHECY 

The melloAv summer moon hung in 
the clear blue sky, an iridescent ball 
of floating silA'er. This Avas my last 
night in Maine, and my mind Avas 
vaguely troubled by memories Avhich 
persisted in annoying me. In order to 
quell the uneasiness I pushed my canoe 
off the sandy beach and paddled sIoav- 
ly to the opposite shore, Avhere the 
shadoAvs hung dark and heavy under 



10 



THE TATTLER 



the giant fir trees overhanging the 
Avater's edge. The solemn, brooding 
stillness of the dimly outlined shore in- 
creased my uneasiness so I turned the 
prow and paddled easily out into deep 
water. Here the moon changed the 
glistening drops falling off my gleam- 
ing paddle until they sparkled like 
diamonds in a queen's crown. 

While listening to the rippling 
water gently rocking me to and fro, a 
certain peaceful happiness seemed to be 
stealing over me, for tomorrow I 
would be back with my old friends in 
Burgy. There I would see them again 
after many years' absence. Oh, 
but it would seem good to meet them 
all once more. But would all my class 
mates still be there to welcome me? I 
did not know. 

The moon was growing hazy and in- 
distinct, the lake and shore-line were 
slowly fading from view. I was mov- 
ing — but where '? Things began to 
brighten again ; but all was not well, 
decidedly not. 

I was in a city, a big city judging by 
the sAvirl of traffic around me. A large 
biiilding loomed up before my aston- 
ished eyes. "The "Woolworth Build- 
ing ! New York ! How in the world 
did I ever — " 

I was interrupted by a thump so vig- 
orous that my nose- rimmed spectacles 
described a flying arc, landing in the 
gutter Avhile tears mounted to my eye- 
lids in spite of all that I could do. 
"Hello, Sammy, old boy. Haven't seen 
you in years ! Where have you been 
keeping yourself?" 

Who in the world was this presum- 
ing person. Some lunatic probably I 
The voice seemed faintly familiar, but 
I turned indignantly around and met 
the cool, laughing eyes of a six-footer, 
who was regarding me humorously. 

"I believe you've made a mistake, 



my dear man. "I stated as austerely as 
possible, "My name is Sampson, I live 
in California — connected with the — " 

"Sure." my new friend interrupted, 
"You're Frederick Sampson from 
Burgy High. Good old Sammy."" 

A great light seemed to burst sud- 
denly upon me, "And you're Barry 
Gray!" I cried wringing his hand. 
"HoAv are you, old felloAv? How you 
have changed though." 

We stepped into his ear and soon 
Avere comfortably seated in his private 
room. "How would you like to see 
some of the other fellows?"" he asked 
laughing boyishly at my astonished 
nod of acquiescence. We chatted mer- 
rily for half an hour, during which 
time we exchanged notes. This is what 
T gathered from his conversation. He 
had been a stenographer in New York 
after being graduated from Northamp- 
ton Commercial College. Gradually he 
had risen from the ranks until now he 
stood at the top of his profession, — the 
foremost broker in Wall Street. He 
gave me a valuable tip on the stock 
market as we rose to go. 

"Let's get a square meal down 
town," Barry laughed, "I know a fine 
place." And it was. We entered the 
Waldorf Restaurant while a waiter in 
full dress uniform caine hurrying to- 
wards our table. 

"Howes, this is Mr. Sampson, an old 
friend of yours." but Howes merely 
bowed acknowledgment from the hips. 
"Is this "Mit" Howes?" I asked 
meekly gazing at this solemn, awe-in- 
spiring person. 

We finished eating and left in 
troubled silence. When we were on 
the street once more Barry told me 
that "'Mit" maintained this solemn 
way ahvaj'S. How different from the 
happy old Milton of former school 
davs ! 



THE TATTLER 



11 



A blaze of colored lights next at- 
tracted our notice, i 

Marguerite Fornier — Soprano ! 

Leading lady in "Peggy," Broad- 
way's latest. Of course we went in 
and heard her. A marvelous voice. We 
were soon behind the scenes, Barry be- 
ing acquainted Avith the door keeper. 
Here we met a well proportioned man 
in a Van Dyke beard and a silken waxed 
moustache. I learned that this was 
Richard Manwell, director of the new 
"Musical Review" being staged on 
Broadway. Everything was hustle and 
bustle. If this was success, I preferred 
my own modest little business. 

As we were leaving, a little man 
bumped into me almost knocking me 
over. "Beg pardon," he gasped, "In 
a hurry." Richard Bissell ! I'd have 
known this cocksure little person any- 
where. Who was it said "Revenge is 
sweet ?" I grabbed him by the coat 
collar while he scowled and pulled my 
necktie savagely. "An eye for an 
eye." quoth he. 

"Do you know me, Richard?" I 
asked him sarcastically. "I'm Samp- 
son, the strong boy." 

"Might have known it," snapped 
Dick angrily, "up to your old tricks," 
then he smiled his most engaging smile. 
Then he told me how he had run away 
when he was at school and joined the 
circuS; and had been clowning ever since. 
He surely liked it. After a brief chat 
with Richard, who had always been an 
old favorite of mine, back in Senior 
school days, we started for home. 

"This certainly has been an exciting 
day," I remarked to Gray, "but what 
a change in them all." 

Grate — scrape — ^erash, I awoke with 
a start to find my canoe beached, 
while it was tipped partly on its side. 
I was in grave danger of falling out 
but I managed to scramble ashore. I 



made directly for my tent because the 
air was cold. Soon I was in bed 
dreaming peaceful dreams once more 
of W. H. S. and my old classmates 
and friends. 

Frederick Sampson, 

Class of '26. 



CLASS WILL 

To Whom It May Concern 

Last Will and Testament of the 
Class of 1926. 

Be it remembered that we, the class of 
1926, knowing that we must depart this 
life and thereby realizing the uncertain- 
ty of the future do make this our last 
will and testament. After the payment 
of our just debts we do bequeath and 
devise as follows: — 

To the class of 1930, the fond hope 
that they will uphold the honor and tra- 
ditions of Burgy High. 

To our successors, the class of 1927, 
the loving memory of P. M. Session with 
the kind hope that they may experience 
the same next year. 

To our sister class of 1928, all our 
varied experience, our pulls with the 
faculty, our kindness, liberality and 
faithfulness towards study and the right 
to occupy the seats in Miss Dunphy's 
room. 

To Mr. Bauer, the privilege of fixing 
up the tennis court. 

Barry Gray's ability to make teachers 
laugh, to Fred Duplissey. 

To Mr. Warner, the privilege of tiim- 
ming the hedges and mowing the lawns 
with a corn-cob pipe for company. 

Manwell 's good looks and ability to at- 
tract girls to Malcolm Foster with cer- 
tain restrictions on his conduct in pub- 
lic. 

Bissell 's 1925 license for the Ford to 
James Coogan if he will promise to use 
it only on graduation night. 

To Miss Dunphy, absolute control 



12 



THE TATTLER 



over her present room if she will promise 
to restore P. M. Session for delinquents. 

To the class of 1927, our Senior trip 
if they solemnly declare that they will 
not leave the United States. 

Bissell leaves his excessive might and 
ability to play tennis to Mary Black. 

To Miss Merrifield we leave our best 
wishes for a i:)leasant and happy future. 

To Mrs. Warner we leave our Civics 
note books provided she places them up- 
on the piano in plain view. 

Howe's ability to handle a Studebak- 
er to Waller. 

Marguerite Fornier leaves her flirting 
capacity to Myrtice Bicknell. 

To the school we leave our ivy as a 
gentle reminder. 

Marguerite's bashful way to Dorothy 
Mayotte if she will try to overcome it. 

Sampson, Gray and Howes leave their 
ability to play basketball and to knock 
home runs to Foster, Grace and Coogan. 

Manwell leaves his peculiar method of 
translating French to bashful and 
retiring Alyce Nash. 

Richard Bissell leaves his wit to Rob- 



ert Tetro if the latter will not turn the 
same upon him. 

Frederick Sampson leaves his beauti- 
ful baritone voice to Ruth Tetro in the 
form of a Soprano. 

To the president of the Junior class 
we will our personal effects, that is, 
pencils, pens, rulers, etc. May you use 
them wisely and well. 

Sampson's literary abilitj^ to Leslie 
Packard. 

In further benevolence we will to the 
class of 1927 our vast size and ability 
as a class if they do not abuse said leg- 
acy. 

In silent testimony thereof, we here- 
with set our hands and seals and with 
the presence of proper witnesses do de- 
clare this to be our one and only last 
will and testament, this 24th day of 
June, in the year of our Lord one thou- 
sand nine hundred and twenty six. 
The class of 1926 
Executors 
Mrs. R. A. Warner 
Richard Manwell 
Frederick Sampson 



Oagg Moll 



CLASSICAL COURSE 

Elizabeth Kempkes 
Richard Manwell 



GENERAL COURSE 

Richard Bissell 

Marguerite Fornier 

Barry Gray 

Milton Howes 
Frederick Sampson 



:j. 



J 



Loyalty 

The dictionary definition is much too 
eold and devoid of meaning to express 
the true and real meaning' of tlie word 
"loyalty". Christianity and Patriotism 
in common accord and by experience 
have found the better and more beauti- 
ful meaning of that word Loyalty. 

What was it that made our boys in 
France fight side by side, die hand in 
hand with their eyes turned for a last 
loving look upon the softly billowing 
folds of "Old Glory" that seemed to 
beckon on? Was it selfishness, egotism 
or infidelity ? No ! A thousand times no ! 
It was pure, indefinable loyalty to their 
God and their Country. 

What a wonderful sacrifice to give 
one's all so that the rest of the world 
might live. Yet there was one who was 
nailed to a rough wooden cross and al- 
lowed to die because of loyalty to His 
God and yours. 

Loyalty or the "Esprit de Corps" is 
the real basis of success whether politic- 
al, commercial, religious, fraternal or 
military. Schools could not succeed, 
railroads could not keep schedules, 
sports could not be played if Loyalty 
was not the main factor governing the 
enterprise. Loyalty is necessary in any 
sport but is often lacking. When true 
patriotism has been acquired then comes 
the real feeling of loyalty. When one 
truly seeks the truth then can he ap- 
preciate Christ's Loynlt'ij. When one 
has learned to obey he has experienced 
the pain and thrill of Loyalty. When 
absolute loyalty has been obtained in 
school or country, think what will be ac- 
complished. Then there will be harmony, 
not discord, united effort, not strife. 
Let's make our school a symbol of real 
progress and righteousness. The first 
lesson would be to obey those in author- 



ity and give them our hearty support 
both in act and deed. Then would we 
know the true meaning of Loyalty. 

Frederick Sampson '26. 

Patriotism 

These are the days when many peo- 
ple seem to be trying to see how many 
laws they can break in safety. They 
take pleasure in telling how they get 
around the prohibition laws, how they 
drive without a license, and hunt and 
fish when and where they please, and 
hoAv this person and that, is breaking 
some law or other. They are unwilling 
to cooperate in any public way with an 
official to obtain the arrest of a law 
breaker. It would be telling, and all 
the neighbors would be down on them. 

What a foolish sentiment ! Why can 't 
they be patriotic enough to act for the 
country instead of their own selfish in- 
terests. And yet these same people 
would be among the first to wave the 
flag at a patriotic meeting. 

These narrow-minded people cannot 
conceive of a law being necessary if it is 
not necessary in their own little com- 
munity or for their own selfish desires. 
They do not trust the wisdom of the 
legislators whom they have aided in ap- 
pointing. They cannot see where their 
own rights end and the rights of other 
people begin. 

Those same people who would fight 
hardest for their country in time of war 
are undermining its very foundations in 
time of peace, though unwittingly. 
What can we do to remedy this evil? 
Education is the only answer. But what 
can we do with the feeble-minded and 
those people who have inherited tenden- 
cies toward crime? This is one of our 
most difficult problems, but a problem 
which we, the coming generation, must 
solve. 



14 



THE TATTLER 




The Blue-bird 

The blue-bird is here — his note sweet and clear 
Is heard from the limb of the tree; 

And when I appear, he seems not to fear 
But is singing a spring song to me. 

The south land he left behind in his flight; 

The north even then he would seek. 
But when lie arrives, no mates are in sight 

As he wings o'er the field and the peak. 

The late snows will come, but he does not mind, 
For he knows that it soon will be warm. 

The children he sees will always be kind 
And so keep him safe from all harm. 

At length he will find a shy little mate, 
And then their nest they will build. 

When late in the fall they swing on the gate. 
They'll teach their children old trills. 

Marv Black '28 



Accepting Dorothea's Advice 

"Come on, girls, let's go and practice 
basketball instead of finishing that mis- 
erable sewing for the orphanage," said 
Myrtle. "It really seems a shame we 
should be expected to go to school and 
work all day and then work after- 
wards." 

"Well, why were you so anxious to 
take the work up in the first place, if 
you didn 't want to go through Avith it ? " 
retorted Dorothea before the others haet 
time to reply. 

"Oh well, if that's the way you feel 
about it, I suppose we can do it," grum- 



bled Myrtle. "Just because you like to 
Avork all the time, don't imagine we all 
do." 

' ' I suppose if you don 't w^ant to work, 
we can do without you," Dorothea ans- 
wered sharply, "but it does seem as if 
you might keep your promise to Mrs. 
Elsinore and help." 

"Come, come, girls," cried Peggy, 
whom they had nicknamed "The Peace- 
maker," "You'll never get anywhere 
standing there arguing. If you'll work 
hard for about an hour there'll be plen- 
ty of time to practice afterwards." 

When they had nearly reached the 
Elsinore 's, Doris exclaimed, ''Aunt 
Alice is standing in the door. Some- 
thing 's up ! " 

As soon as the girls were near enough. 
Mrs. Elsinore called, "Please hurry! 
we've loads of work to do, but if you 
get it done quickly you won 't be sorry. ' ' 

Without more ado the girls went in, 
and taking off their wraps, set to work. 
In about an hour all the work was done, 
and Mrs. Elsinore complimented them on 
their sewing, adding, "Now go and 
practice basketball if you want to, but 
be back here at five o'clock sharp." 

Wondering, the girls started to prac- 
tice, and still wondering came back to 
Mrs. Elsinore 's at five. When they saw 
Elsinore 's big automobile out in the 
drive, they were even more puzzled. As 



THE TATTLER 



15 



before, Mrs. Elsinore was waiting for 
them at the door. 

"Hello, girls," she greeted them, 
"glad to see you so prompt. I think we 
will fit if we all sit tight, don't you? 
You know the state championship game 
is to be played in Woodstock tonight. 
Well, seeing you've been good, some- 
thing unusual you know, ' ' she said with 
a twinkle, "I thought I'd take you 
over. ' ' 

"Well, I don't know about that 'good' 
part, but we all want to see that game, 
Aunt Alice," said Ruth. 

Soon they were seated and ready to 
start. Singing and laughing all the way, 
it seemed but a short time, before they 
were in Woodstock. After having some- 
thing to eat, they went for a ride, and 
thus passed the time before the game. 
Great was their rejoicing when their 
favorite team won after playing two 
over-time periods. 

"You know, Dorothea," said Myrtle, 
when they were nearly home, "I'll al- 
ways take your advice and work, if I 
live to be a thousand. " 

Pauline Webb '28. 



The Reward of Service 



Light 

Tlie morn is fair, the sun is bright, 

Each little tiny ray 
Peeps in at me to help me write 

The words I cannot say. 

Malcolm Foster '28. 



Winter Joys 

I wandered lone one wintry day, 
Across the fields and far away, 
The air was cold, the sky was clear, 
And I had naught of care or fear. 

Fannie Merritt '28. 



Mrs. Burnett wandered listlessly from 
room to room in her large, luxurious 
home in one of the pleasant suburbs 
of New York. It was a hot July morn- 
ing, and most of the people from this 
fashionable part of the city had gone to 
their summer homes in the country — or 
at the sea-shore. But Mr. and Mrs. Bur- 
nett still remained in their city home 
although the weather was warm and un- 
comfortable. 

It was just a year ago that their little 
two-year-old boy had been kidnapped, 
while playing underneath a large tree in 
the yard of their beautiful summer es- 
tate, and since that time they could not 
bear to go back without their precious 
little Billy. 

Every clue had been followed, and de- 
tectives were continually at work on the 
case, which now seemed to be almost 
hopeless. 

Mrs. Burnett finally sat down, and 
covering her face with her hands sobbed 
as if her heart would break. All at once 
a thought came to her; perhaps she 
might ease her own pain by becoming 
interested in helping other people's 
children. She began to ponder over the 
matter and finally plans and prepara- 
tions were being made for some poor 
city children to be brought to her coun- 
try house for a week's vacation. There 
must be nurses and attendants for the 
children, and the house must be opened 
and made ready. 

At last everything was completed, and 
in a short time the children arrived. 

As the large, beautiful car owned by 
Mr. and Mrs. Burnett swung into the 



16 



THE TATTLER 



drive-way, the voices of happy children 
greeted them, and soon they were in the 
midst of the joyous throng. What a 
pretty picture it made with the small 
children romping and playing on the 
lawn while the larger ones ran back and 
forth among the trees. 

Suddenly there was a cry of joy, and 
everyone looked in time to see one of the 
little fellows clasped tightly in Mrs. Bur- 
nett "s arms. Oh ! the excitement and 
happiness of that moment could never 
be described, for the little boy she held 
so closely was their OAvn little Billy. 

It was learned that a man and woman 
had carried him away with the hope of 
receiving money, but becoming fright- 
ened, they had dropped him among some 
poor children in the city street. He was 
a beautiful child, and the ignorant fam- 
ily that took him in did not mind having 
one more, especially such a pretty baby, 
and as he was naturally a good natured 
little fellow, he soon became accustomed 
to the place and made the best of his 
poor surroundings. 

Oh! how thankful they all were that 
Mrs. Burnett had decided to try help- 
ing others that she might forget her own 
trouble and unhappiness. 

If the thought had not come to her 
on that hot morning, her precious little 
Billy might have grown up in poverty 
without ever knowing his daddy anci 
wonderful mother, or the beautiful 
home and surroundings that really be- 



longed to him. 



Olive Rhoades '28 



Mystic 

I had entered Mystic following my 
graduation in 1931, and, for the first 
year, which was to be expected, I was 
a plebe with my classmates. 

While on my vacation the next sum- 
mer, I met a girl in my old home town 



and as friendship continued throughout 
the summer I found out that she had a 
friend — before I came — who was enter- 
ing Mystic in the fall. Of course, I was 
and was not interested in him because I 
might have broken his friendship or he 
might break mine. Nevertheless, I forgot 
him, and had my vacation which was 
very pleasant. Leaving for Mystic, 
Sept. 5, I reported at the Registrar's 
the 7th, and in welcoming our lower 
classmen, I was interested to see my 
rival, Percy Jones. 

Percy Jones was the only son of a 
wealthy family, so he had plenty of 
money to work with. I met him and 
tried to be a friend, but soon found out 
that he knew of my standing with Lu- 
cille. 

I had received my commission at 
the end of my first year, and, wishing 
to rid myself of the name of a plebe, I 
worked hard and in a short time I had 
a class of well disciplined students ex- 
cept — Percy Jones. I was strict with 
his training and soon thought I had him 
under my control. But on June 18, 
1933, I was called to the Registrar's of- 
fice where I was charged vnth theft of 
letters from Percy, and after a search 
they were found in my room, much to 
my surprise. As Percy's money spoke 
the loudest, I was deprived of my com- 
mission and was again a plebe. 

I spent my vacation nearly as I had 
before except that I studied the funda- 
mentals of radio and electricity. Dur- 
ing my vacation, I learned much of 
Percy's disposition and how he had lost 
his standing with Lucille. This, of 
course, was one victory, but my commis- 
sion would be a greater one. Leaving in 
the fall with Lucille 's encouragement, I 
fell sure that I could succeed, and dur- 
ing that year, I completed my course in 
radio and electricity, and also received a 



THE TATTLEE 



17 



new commission as Chief Eadio Operator 
which was above all of my classmates in- 
eluding Percy Jones. In June, I be- 
gan my vacation by working as Chief 
Radio Operator on the Cambridge, the 
new rotor ship belonging to the Mass- 
achusetts Institute of Technology. On 
my discharge in August, I went to Meri- 
dith for the last of my vacation before 
I entered my Senior year. Having a 
happy vacation, and a promise, I earned 
my commission as Assistant Chief Petty 
Officer as well as Chief Radio Opera- 
tor. But my fall came in May. When 
giving orders one day, Percy disobeyed, 
and I, thinking that force would make 
him obey, started to use some but Percy 
ran. While running up the guy plank 
to the vessel on which he was stationed 
he fell and injured his head. I was not 
really to blame for the fall but money 
said I was, and I was discharged from 
college on the charge of injuring Jones 
so as to cause blindness. 

After spending a month in Baltimore, 
I went back to see my classmates grad- 
uated. Afterwards Slim Jackson and 
Bill Johnson informed me that Jones 
had left college to go to a hospital, where 
he was partly cured and had later taken 
a government position as an aviator. 

Returning to Meridith, we found Lu- 
cille greatly troubled. It developed that 
Percy had been sent on an expedition to 
California and his plane was reported 
lost in the Rockies. Probably his 
eyes prevented him from returning to 
civilization, if he was alive. I was 
blamed, of course, by Lucille. 

Slim, Bill and I started for Califor- 
nia and after months of searching, found 
Percy who so appreciated our help that 
he appeared at Mystic to tell of his false 
report of serious blindness. As a result 
I was graduated with my commissions. 
And the promise? Invitations are out 



for a Naval Wedding in October and 
Lucille is choosing the maid of honor. 
Warren McAvoy '28 



A Haunted Island 

As the two Brown boys were on their 
way home after listening to an old sail- 
or who had been talking about an island 
that was haunted, the.y decided to go 
and see for themselves if it was true. 

Thej^ started the next morning in 
their small sail-boat. They had brought a 
shot-gun, but they really didn't know 
why they did. After sailing for about 
an hour along the coast, they came in 
sight of the island. It was long and 
narrow with a wide sandy beach, back 
of which were a few tall trees which 
towered above all the others. They soon 
ran their boat onto the sandy beach and 
entered the woods. It was very dark and 
gloomy because the trees were so close to- 
gether that they shut out the light. 

They had not gone very far when they 
heard a shrill cry which seemed to come 
from the tree tops. They looked up in 
astonishment but could not see any ob- 
ject. Again the shrill cry came and this 
time it could be heard plainly crying, 
' ' Get out of here, what do you want, you 
lubbers?" They thought that someone 
was trying to have some fun with them 
so they started on. They saw a light 
spot ahead and they thought that they 
were coming to an open field, but when 
they reached there they found that if 
was a great mass of sand. In the center 
were the ribs of a large ship. 

John started to examine it, but his 
brother Jack refused to go. As soon 
as John stepped upon the sand, his foot 
sank out of sight. When he tried to lift 
it out, it sank deeper. He was soon up 
to his waist. His brother climbed out 
onto a limb which hung over the san* 
and pulled him out. They now realized 



18 



THE TATTLER 



that it was a bed of quick sand. Then 
they heard the cry again, this time it 
said, "Don't go there." 

They were about to start back when 
they heard what seemed to be a great 
commotion in the bushes. John hastened 
in and what lie saw made him think he 
was dreaming. There, in a small clear- 
ing, was a huge snake crushing a small 
monkey, which was squealing. After a 
few shots they succeeded in killing the 
snake. There also, was the owner of the 
mysterious voice sitting upon a low 
branch of a tree. It was the finest par- 
rot that they had ever seen. After 
coaxing it with a piece of cake that was 
taken from their lunch. Jack succeeded 
in getting his hand on it and picking it 
up. 

When Jack put it on the front of the 
boat, it did not move so he thought 
that it was contented to stay with him. 
As John had taken the little monkey 
that the snake had nearly killed, the 
boys knew they would be envied by all 
their playmates and began to have vi- 
sions of untold wealth that they would 
collect from exhibits of their unusual 
find. 

To their amazement, at the breakfast 
table the next morning, they read in a 
large headline of the wreck of a large 
boat loaded with animals for the New 
York Zoo. That easily accounted for 
their island treasure. 

Ronald Emrick. 



The Prom. 



The Prom was only two weeks away. 
Could Dad give her that money for a 
new dress? Sixty dollars seemed such a 
lot for only one dress. And then she'd 
have to have it made. The striking of 
the clock in her father's office broke in 
upon Eleanor Gray's reverie. 

In quite another part of the town, 



Ann Brown was considering a different 
problem, that of making her old things 
do for the dance. She knew her folks 
could not give her the money, and, al- 
though it was hard, she relinquished the 
thought of a new dress. But she knew 
that her room-mate, Louise, was going, 
too, and dreaded to think of the things 
Louise might want to borrow from her. 

As the days flew by, Ann employed 
her skillful fingers in remodeling her 
old dress, often sitting up late at night 
to do it. "At last," she sighed hap- 
pily, "it's done and now to buy those 
silver slippers." Purposely, she had 
hoarded her ten dollars to do it. The 
next morning, just two days before the 
Prom, Louise skipped gaily into Ann's 
room and asked if she could lend her 
ten dollars for a couple of days. Des- 
pairingly, Ann gave her the money and 
said goodbye to her silver slippers. 

In the meantime, Eleanor Gray was 
dazedly counting up the bills she had 
just received while the beautiful new 
evening gown with the orange-colored 
fan hung in the closet. Eighty-five dol- 
lars ! And she had to buy those slippers 
yet. How could she ever have spent so 
much? 



T? ^ ^ TT TT 



When the night of the gala event ar- 
rived, Ann, resplendent in the silver 
.slippers, (Louise had unexpectedly 
brought the money back) with eyes, 
shining like stars, pinned Tom's sweet 
peas onto her dress. "Oh," she cried, 
"they just match my dress. I'm glad 
1 didn 't buy a new dress now. ' ' 

At the same time, Eleanor, worrying 
over the bills so that she couldn't en- 
joy her beautiful dress, dejectedly tried 
to make the roses Allen had given her 
fit into the color scheme. But they 
clashed hopelessly. 

During the evening, Eleanor became 
more worried and simply couldn't en- 



THE TATTLER 



19 



joy the gaiety about her. Enviously, she 
watched Ann, who, without a care in 
the world, was the center of a merry 
group. Afterward in the darkness of 
her own room, she cried herself to sleep. 

The next morning, as Ann and Elea- 
nor were comparing notes and discus- 
sing the dance, Eleanor exclaimed : 

"Well, I've learned my lesson, and, 
hereafter, I'll do my worrying before I 
buy the dress instead of afterward. ' ' 

Helen Merritt '27. 



Relation of Good Roads to 
Education 

Grood roads have always been an im- 
portant factor of education and civil- 
ization. The ancient highways of Rome 
and Greece were woven into networks 
similar to a spider 's web with Rome and 
Athens as the center. It is no wonder 
that Roman civilization was above all 
other nations of the times, where the 
good roads and their weblike ramifica- 
tions exerted such powerful influence 
over the development and morale of the 
Roman Citizen. 

The Aztec civilization, the oldest 
known civilization in America possessed 
one of the best roads ever seen by the 
Spaniards Avho conquered them. The 
Spaniards marveled at such a develop- 
ment in that wilderness. They had tried 
to build a similar road but were forced 
to suspend operations because they could 
not overcome the stupendous obstacles 
even with their more modern tools. Yet 
the Aztecs, whom the Spanish looked 
down upon as ignorant and foolish, had 
foresight enough to connect themselves 
by an easily traveled road with their al- 
lies over the mountains. 

A strong argument in favor of good 
roads is the inferior condition of the 
mountaineers of Kentucky and Cumber- 
lands, where feuds and deaths stalk 



abroad after dark. The roads consist 
only of washed out river beds and deep 
rutted trails which keep the world out 
and the mountaineer in, most of the 
year. In the valley below, where good 
roads are found, the people are well edu- 
cated, happy and contented, in marked 
contrast to the surly mountaineers. 

In rural communities much must be 
done to keep the roads in condition for 
the school bus Avhich transports four- 
teen million children to and from school 
daily. If the roads are impassable for 
a time each year, the pupil soon fails 
to reach the required standards. 

Some towns have not yet realized that 
an improved highway' is the quickest 
means of progress, not only to pupils, 
but also to farmers, tradesmen and city 
buyers, all of whom mean prosperity to 
the town or city. On the common dirt 
road, the spring thaws work havoc. The 
traveler finds himself mired when the 
bottom apparently drops out of the 
road, leaving him to his own sad reflec- 
tion. His hastily formed opinion is 
carried back to the city where he tries 
to discourage all his friends from going 
to such a place. 

Massachusetts with the aid of the 
Federal Government has done much to 
overcome poor roads. The towns and 
cities have cooperated with the state so 
that the bad highways are gradually be- 
ing transformed much to the joy of the 
transient motorist. Today, we are real- 
izing that good roads and a good system 
of communication are still the greatest 
factors of progress as in the days of an- 
cient glory. 

Frederick Sampson '26. 



Cher Ami 



Cher Ami is the name given to the 
carrier pigeon of whom I write. 
The name means a ''dear friend." He 



20 



THE TATTLER 



M'as sent abroad Avith the United States 
army during the World War. 

When Cher Ami arrived in France, 
he began to receive instructions about 
becoming a carrier pigeon. He was very 
quick to learn, and for that reason, his 
teacher paid special attention to him. 

His first duty was to carry a message 
from a company of soldiers, captured by 
the Germans, to the main forces, about 
three miles away. He did this, and the 
Commander immediately sent aid. The 
Company was surrounded and the Ger- 
men captors were taken prisoners. For 
this deed, Cher Ami was highly praised. 

But Cher Ami was not satisfied with 
just one glorious deed, he wanted to do 
more, and above all to fly for General 
Pershing. When he made this wish, he 
did not realize how soon his chance 
would come. 

One day, not a great while afterwards, 
the United States Army crossed the 
Meuse River, and cut off the Germans 
from all their supplies. The Germans 
could do nothing but surrender their 
army, guns, ammunition and all they 
had. 

Cher Ami had been sleeping all day, 
but when his cage door was opened, he 
Avoke with a start. A private Avas fast- 
ening a message onto his leg ! When the 
private had made the tube with the won- 
derful news inside secure, he picked the 
pigeon up in his hands, and, patting his 
feathers gently, said : ' ' Straight to Gen- 
eral Pershing, Cher Ami. ' ' The bird 's 
heart was leaping with joy as he flew 
into the air. 

He had not gone far when he heard 
a few sharp cracks from the rifles of 
German sharpshooters below. He sud- 
denly felt a sharp pain in his leg. The 
poor bird realized that the foot bearing 
the wonderful news, had been hit by a 
stray bullet. He felt his strength going 
as his wound continued to bleed. He 



was a very weary bird when he reached 
his destination, thirty-seven miles away, 
and no sooner had he arrived than he 
fainted. 

The next thing that Cher Ami knew 
was, that he was being patted by a gentle 
hand. He was too weary to open his 
eyes. Soon he heard the voice of his ofd 
teacher saying, "I think. General Per- 
shing, that this pigeon ought to be 
awarded the 'Distinguished Service Me- 
dal," don't you?" 

General Pershing answered, "I will 
see that he gets one, he certainly de- 
serves it." 

When Cher Ami heard this, he opened 
his eyes and realized that his ambition 
had been fulfilled. 

M. Foster, '28. 



Jack, The Burro 

Jack was born in the Grand Canyon 
with a herd of wild burros. These bur- 
ros were camp raiders and spoiled many 
a tourist's camp, until one day, the cow- 
boys thought it was time to stop it. So, 
when Jack was a little over a week old, 
many men came to the canyon and cap- 
tured or killed the entire herd of burros. 

Jack's mother Avas killed, but as he 
Avas hidden in the rocks, he Avas not 
found. HoAvever, Avith his food supply 
gone, he began to starve and for tAvo 
days he just nibbled grass. Those days 
Avere like a nightmare to the little bur- 
ro, but Avith the daAvning of the third 
day a packer drove his pack-burros up 
the canyon. 

Jack seeing some of his oaa'u kind AA'ob- 
bled out to meet them. The packer picked 
him up and, knoAAdng that a band of 
burros had been cleaned out, he cared for 
the little felloAv and resoh'ed to keep 
him. Jack Avas fed condensed milk 
thinned Avith Avater, from a pail. 

Jack thrived and Avas a full groAvn 



THE TATTLEE 



21 



burro in a year. Jim Davis, his mas- 
ter, began to teach him to work, but be- 
ing xevy l&zj, Jack took Frencli leave 
for his old haunts. He found a few 
burros there and joined the band. He 
lived there in peace for almost two years 
and became king because of his experi- 
ence and fighting power. He led his 
herd to many camjDs, lured away tame 
burros and trampled supplies to get 
salt and sugar. 

Every so often, the Avild burros caused 
a great deal of trouble, so they had to 
be captured or killed. One day, a large 
number of cowboys rounded up Jack's 
herd and captured most of them. Jack 
was given back to his old master, Jim 
Davis. At first, he was wild and unruly, 
but after a month of kindness, he be- 
came a good pack animal. 

Being a good pack animal is not so 
easy as it may seem. Jack found that 
the pack was wider than his body and 
that he must allow room for it on all 
the canyon trails. The trails were often 
only three or four feet wide and if the 
pack was not carried correctly the bur- 
row would be pushed from the trail in- 
to the canyon. 

One bright morning. Mischief, a young 
burrow, w^as brushed off the trail. He 
landed in a small clump of trees and was 
badly shaken up, but otherwise uninjur- 
ed. Jack then resolved never to be care- 
less with a pack. 

He became such a good packer, that 
he was shifted to Avhat his friends cal- 
led the worst job possible. It was car- 
rying tourists up and down the Angel 
Trail that led into the canyon. He had 
a great deal of fun frightening them by 
leaning over for a bunch of grass or 
walking on the edge of the trail. But 
for the most part his work was tiresome 
after his Avild life. 

One summer night, he coaxed his 
friend Mischief to run awav. Thev trot- 



ted silently away from their master, 
never to carry another pack or frighten 
a tourist again. 

Jack and Mischief rested and feasted 
on the rich grass at Jack's old home, but 
being lonesome, they soon began to lure 
tame burros away from their owners. 
Not satisfied Avith just grass for feed, 
they raided camps for sweets. They 
would rush on a camp at night, and 
when the frightened tourists vacated, 
they spoiled the camp in short order. 
But if the men were experienced cow- 
boys or packers, a shot from a rifle 
would scare the herd away. 

HoAvever, Jack's life was not all peace. 
Men came and captured his friends, and 
he had to start a ncAv herd. Mischief 
had been captured twice, but had ahvays 
escaped and come back to the herd. But 
on a dreary, rainy day. the packers de- 
termined to stop camp raiding for good, 
so they shot the burros instead of cap- 
turing them. 

Jack and Mischief ran along the small 
ledge trying to escape. Mischief got 
aAvay and returned to his old master, but 
Jack slipped, and, Avhen the men found 
him, his body Avas a shapeless hulk. Jack, 
the outlaw, Avas dead. 

Richard Merritt "27. 



The Swallows 

In tlie spring tlie swallows wing, 
Dipping along the green; 
Swiftly, silently, on they go — 
Only a flash is seen. 

Glad are we that flash to see 

As flashing by they go. 

And sorry we'd be to miss that flash 

Darting to and fro. 

From the lands of the South they come. 
To ciieer us every year; 
And with them comes the bluebird, 
"Whose notes we love to hear. 

Pauline Webb '28. 



22 



THE TATTLER 



Wheat 

One of the countiy's most famous 
wheat growing sections is that section 
of the United States between the Missis- 
sippi River and the eastern foothills of 
the Rocky Mountains. 

Wheat is one of the greatest necessi- 
ties of life because it contains most all 
kinds of protein that are found in all 
other foods such as fat, iron, sugar, 
starch, etc. Our forefathers as far back 
as the savages made food from wild 
wheat, then growing in the swamps and 
on river banks, and they considered it a 
great necessity. In this day of cultiva- 
tion many of the lesser civilized coun- 
tries still use the old method of pound- 
ing the kernels of wheat and then, with 
the use of the wind, blow the surplus 
coats of the wheat to one side thus leav- 
ing the pure wheat at their service. 

Wheat, when seen in the fields, looks 
like a great field of herd 's grass but some- 
what higher. When ripe the wheat 
spears are a golden yellow color, and 
the wheat kernels look like those of oats 
in our section of the United States. 

The grain is now cut by a large ma- 
chine drawn by many horses. Besides 
cutting the grain it ties, threshes, and 
cleans the wheat. It is then bagged and 
sent to the gin where it is pulverized 



and again cleaned and bagged and dis- 
tributed all over the world. 

Leroy Weeks '28. 



Summer 

In t'lie bky the sun is shining 

Sunbeams sliimnier througii the trees; 
Brooks are sparkling, ri%ers running, 

There's a drowsy hum of bees. 

In the iielcis tlie flowers are blooming, 

Buttercups and lilies fair; 
Daisies nodding to each other, 

Fragrance filling all the air. 

In the tree-tops birds are singing, 
Music thrilling all who hear; 

And the happy songs are bringing 
Thoughts of life and Joy and cheer. 

Olive Rhoades '28. 



Inspiration 

Pretty little pansy face 
Peeping through the snow; 
Little bonnet edged with lace. 
Oil ! I love you so. 

Little cheery pansy face 
Welcom'd by us all: 
As you smile beside the l^ase 
Of our garden wall. 

Vs I watch your sunny grace, 
Good resolves I make. 
That I'll win with smiling face 
The game of gi\ e and take. 

Mildred Roberge '28. 



THE TATTLER 



23 




"Burgy" High School was forced to 
drop soccer this year because of lack of 
funds. All enthusiasm was thrown into 
basketball. We discovered many new 
men among the twenty that turned out, 
Grace being the prominent one. He 
proved a valuable aid to both teams. 

Under our new coach, Mr. Anderson, 
we defeated Conway and Charlemont, 
while the second team, under Mr. Mer- 
ritt, won both of their games. 

Smarting from a defeat handed us by 
St. Michael's we attacked Ashfield, but 
lost by one point. The Alumni had a 
strong team and we were swamped by a 
double score. 

Charlemont seconds were lost under 
W. H. S. 's strong second team. But the 
first team game was a slaughter. The 
referee killing "Burgy'' players via the 
personal foul route. 

At Conway the referee had trouble 
with our coach and the next day the 
team was without a coach ; but, after 
much discussion and worry, Mr. Mer- 
ritt kindly consented to help us out. The 



teams improved under his guidance and 
both Avalked over Smith Academy. 

GoodAvin, our outstanding star, again 
missed fire, and did not get to Holyoke 
and we were badly beaten. Next, South 
Deerfield proved too strong for us and 
the season ended with a defeat by the 
Second Congo of Holyoke. 

The second team won half of its 
games, while the first team was not so 
•lucky. The Seniors claim four of the 
regulars, Gray, Goodwin, HoAves and 
Sampson, but the prospects for next year 
are good as Ave have four good men left. 

A musical entertainment giA^en in 
April yielded fifty dollars and Avith that 
help Ave started baseball Avith Mr. Bauer 
as coach. 

We have played fiA-e games, Avinning 
one from ConAvay Avith a score 3-2, Avith 
GoodAvin and HoAves as a battery and 
also as the best hitters. 

Practice has been upset by the ap- 
proach of Graduation, but Ave haA^e three 
games to play and believe Ave shall hare 
better luck. 

R. H. Merritt '27. 



24 



THE TATTLER 




J. 



< 



President, Robert Tetro 

Vice-President, Hazel Hathaway 
See. & Treas., Hadley Wheeler 

The rapid decrease in the size of this 
once husky class has caused the unhappy 
Juniors no little consternation. AVe 
must remember that the Seniors started 
their Freshman year witli a goodly 
number also. So Juniors beware! The 
biggest loss of the year was borne brave- 
ly when Grace Nash decided to leave 
their benevolent wing for the great un- 
known — viz — the world at large. 

Hazel Hathaway says she is going to 
vote for Andrew Mellon for president. 
When asked the reason, she said, "Oh, 
just because I like the name Mellon." 
Indeed ! 

Coogan, the boy witli the pompadour, 
admits his tastes run more to heroes and 
sport clothes. Well, Jack, beware oi 
the fickle women. They are not to l)e 
taken like medicine after every meal. 



Bob Tetro, the young prodigy, has 
acquired some of his education (uits'nU^ 
W. H. S. Our advice is to dro[) the I'cnii- 
nine role and turn reformer. 

Ruth, Bob's big sister, has the wHuhl 
at her feet. We didn't know that slie 
could tiy so high. She is a vahi.ihk' ad- 
dition to our school chorus. 

As for Emrick, it is the school's wisli 
that he hurry up and learn to iday 
that violin of his. Cheer up, Ronald, 
old boy, you've got another year yet to 
startle the world. Just get going, that's 
all. 

Helen Merritt is known to be the best 
scholar in the class. She has a reputa- 
tion to uphokl and is doing her best to 
carry it on. We wish lier all due suc- 
cess. 

It is the wish of the class that Wheeler 
continue his practice on the cornet, that 
we may use him to advantage next year 
in our rapidly improving orchestra. 



THE TATTLER 



25 



Packard comes to the fore with the 
assertion that clothes make the man. 
This seems to solve the school mysterj- 
drama as to the reason why he has never 
grown up. 

The Fates are laughing at Richard 
Merritt for trying to reform the versa- 
tile Freshmen. We hate to snicker but 
a joke's a joke. 

Everj' class has its youngsters and the 
Juniors are no excej»tion. With unani- 
mous accord they have elected Alice Nash 
"class infant. * Hooray! With the same 
purpose in mind they have elected 



Helen WelLs as the most bashful girl in 
class. 

And last but not least comes Duplissey 
from the 'Wilds' of Cumniington who 
holds every one but the Freshmen girls 
in contempt. We're all good guesseris. 
Does her name begin with R, Freddie, 
old top? 

The Juniors are certainly going to trj- 
to hold the Senior seats next year. They 
are a fine, clever class, however, for all 
we may say of them. Here's hoping 
that they achieve the 100% class stand- 
ard which the Seniors have not done. 



26 



THE TATTLER 







SJ5S 



President — Malcolm Foster 

Vice-President — Olive Rhoades 
Sec. & Treas. Warren McAvoy 

This class of '28 has a reputation to 
uphold, that of being the noisiest class 
in the building, excluding, of course, 
the freshmen who never seem to get 
the idea that they are not in grammar 
school where they can make all the 
noise that is possible. The '28'ers 
seem to have forgotten that they are 
Sophs. Come now, and tone down a 
little ! 

We are very much afraid that Jack 
Tuski will break his neck some day rid- 
ing on that milk truck the way he does. 

Some of the Sophomore girls would 
like to know what beauty parlor Henry 
Drake frequents. 

Will somebody please tell us why 
Roy Weeks insists on tooting his 
bugle at such unearthly hours as 8.00 



A. M. Cheer up "Squeeks" you'll get 
there yet. 

"Bud" Foster is becoming a strong 
adherent to the game of baseball. He 
is "adhered" to third base. Don't be 
afraid of that beautiful "visage" of 
yours Bud and go down after the 
grounders. They can brush you off 
after the game. 

Mildred Roberge our "petite enfant" 
of the class of '28 seems to find it great 
fun to take some of the Grammar 
School children out to walk. Keep it 
up Mildred. 

Clara Atherton, although she does 
buy her clothes at the doll's store, has 
a wicked arm when it comes to playing 
baseball. So has her sister Evelyn, who 
we think, gets her practice riding in the 
Chrysler. 

We greatly fear that Myrt Bieknell 
is going to drop solo work for ensemble 



THE TATTLER 



27 



playing. How about it Jackie? 

Marjorie Otis has the longest hike of 
the class. We don't envy you your 
walk, Marjorie, especially after dark. 

The class as a whole, especially Paul- 
ine Webb, would like to ask Olive how 
the front seat of Mac's Ford rides if 
they only dared. Why don't you try 
the seat yourself, Pauline"? 

Betty Pennington belongs in Henry 
Drake 's class when it conies to the 
beautiful marcels. Why can't we all 
belong to that class? 

"Pete" Frenier is awarded the title 
of General Mischief Maker of the class 
of '28. 

We all want to ask Frances Lloyd 
what all the attraction is on the 2 :45 
car, and we would also like to know 



whether Clara Ames knows of what the 
Haydenville sidewalks are made. 

Why is it that Mary Black prefers 
one of the Freshmen boys? Can't you 
find one your .size, Mary? 

Logia Kmit seems to be the only de- 
mure miss of the class of '28. Very 
good Logy, keep it up ! 

Fannie Merritt, who came down to 
£ee us this year from Chesterfield, is 
always wanting to pitch when playing 
baseball, as she says she can't play out 
field. Will you tell us who couldn't 
pla}^ out field? 

We would like to know why it is that 
John Stanton is always late on Mon- 
day morning. Perhaps because he 
comes from Chesterfield. 



28 



THE TATTLER 





A 



President — James Coogan 
Vice-President — Walter Kulasli 
Sec. & Treas. — Davis Snow 

What Might Be— But Isn't 
Barbara, light as thistle down. 
Seeing Coogan with a frown ; 
"Babe" Grace \^ithout a home run 
Snow in class without some fun ; 
Arlene and Rena without beaux, 
Mari without spotless clothes; 



Cars with Alice and Jane aboard — 
Instead they're riding in a Ford; 
Kulash without 'Journals' and 'Posts' 
Going out to *■ weenie" roasts; 
Elouise winning a race ; 
Doroth}" missing first base ; 
Hoxio hurrying to his Avork ; 
Witherell not playing shirk ; 
Thayer sweet as his maple trees ; 
Waller getting less than B's. 



THE TATTLER 



29 



Mminii 



©tei 



Class of 1925 

Glenn Adams : Westinghouse Radio 
Corporation. 

Ruth Atherton : At home. 

Alvan Barrus : Mt. Hermon School, 
Northfield, Mass. 

Edwin Breckenridge : Northeastern 
University, Boston. 

Elizabeth Burke : Northampton Com- 
mercial College. 

Mrs. Carrol Clark Tower : At home. 

Darby Cook : Williston Academy. 

Gertrude Dobbs : Northampton Com- 
mercial College. 

Edward Foster: Northampton High 
School. 

Hazel Holden : Northampton Commer- 
cial College. 

David Hoxie : Atlantic Union College, 
South Lancaster, Mass. 

Margaret Kempkes : At home. 

Frederick La Valley : Northeastern Uni- 
versity, Boston. 

W. Bruce Nash : Apprentice Carpenter. 

Robert Nash : Studying Music. 

Elizabeth O'Neil: Westtield Normal. 

Wilbur Purrington : Williston Academy. 

Robert Smiley : Northampton Commer- 
cial College. 

Mary Wells : Northampton Commercial 
College. 

Graduations 

Richard Breckenridge '24: Wentworth 

Institute, Boston. 
Mary Burke '24: Westfield Normal. 
Lyndal Cranson '23 : North Adams 

Normal. 
Millie Dansereau '24: North Adams 

Normal. 
Ruth Nutting '21 : Columbia University. 



Wenonah Webb '24: North Adams 
Normal. 

Entered College 

Flora Mamvell '24: Beloit College, 

Beloit, Wis. 
Francis Manwell '24 : Amherst College. 

Positions 

Marion Graham '23 : First National 
Bank, Northampton. 

Edward Schuler '24: International Sil- 
ver Co., Florence. 

Margaret Trainor '24 : Teacher, Orange, 
Mass. 

Ruth Waite '24: Haydenville Brass 
Company. 

Charles Watling '24: H. L. Handy Co., 
Northampton. 

Marriages 

Carrol Clark '25 to 

Harry Tower of Leeds. 
Gertrude Goodwin '22 to 

Clinton T. Bates of Worthington. 
Frederick Healey '19 to 

Myrtle Clark of Chesterfield. 
Rozella Ice '17 to 

Harry Rhoades of Williamsburg. 
Minnie Stetson '23 to 

Ralph Ledue '19 of Chesterfield. 

Births 

Born to Mrs. Mildred Atherton Nye '22 
a boy, Merton Eugene, Feb. 16, '26. 

Born to Mr. and Mrs. (Esther Purring- 
ton '15) Chester Jorgensen '15, a 
boy, Chester Neil, Nov. 30, '25. 

Born to Mrs. Edith Nichols Stiles '22, 
a girl, Lois Ruth, March 3, '26. 

Born to Mrs. Mildred Wells Munson 
'18, a boy, Frank, Dec. 10, '25. 



30 



THE TATTLER 



eJDaiim 



KS5 



President — Ruth Tetro 

Viee-Pres. — Richard ]\Ianwell 

See. & Treas. — Elizabeth Kempkes 

Executive Committee 



Barrv Grav 



Fred Sampson 



The Debating Society has. this year, 
succeeded in haA-ing debates enough to 
enable them to compete for the Alumni 
Prize of five dollars which was award- 
ed to Hazel Hathaway. 

The first debate was: "Resolved. 
that a National Department of Avia- 
tion with its chief in the President's 
Cabinet is a Necessity." Those on the 
affirmative were : Richard Man well. 
Grace Nash and Richard ^Merritt. Those 
on the negative were : Ruth Tatro. Mil- 
ton HoAves and Marguerite Fornier. 
The affirmative Avon. Grace Nash re- 
ceiA'ing first honor and Ruth Tetro sec- 
ond. 



The second debate Avas: ""Resolved 
that Immigration to the United States 
should be Restricted for a Period of 
Ten Years." Those on the aft'irmative 
were : Helen Merritt. Barry Gray and 
Hazel Hathaway. Those on the nega- 
tive Avere : Robert Tetro. Fred Duplis- 
sey and Elizabeth Kempkes. Hazel 
Hathaway Avas aAvarded first honor 
and Barry Gray second. 

The question of the final or prize de- 
bate Avas: "'Resoh-ed. that Moving Pic- 
tures as noAv presented are Beneficial 
to the American Public." This Avas 
Avon by the negatiA-e. Hazel HathaAvay 
receiA'ing the prize and Barry Gray, 
honorable mention. 

During the year there Avere im- 
promptu debates and musical pro- 
grams Avhich added much to the i?njoy- 
ment of the audiences. 

The Debating Society has progressed 
rapidly this year and Ave Avish them 
luck in The future. 



Over the Hills 

Over the hills and far away, 

I A\ander gay and free; 
From early morn to tlie close of day. 

I Avalk o'er heather and lea. 



But if it rains in the early morn, 

I gather my rod and line. 
And wander off through the fields of corn, 

To the pool beneath the pine. 

-Alvstic Bicknell '28. 



THE TATTLER 



31 





UJ vVk 



/Z^yy^y-^ 



^ 



z. 



z / ^ y ^ y ^y -^ / / .^ ~> ^ ^ y 7-^^-7-// , 



Problem in Civics : To find out what 
income is necessary for a family of five. 

Fannie : " I 've inquired and inquired 
and nobody gives me any encourage- 
ment.' 



Mr. B : " What are you chewing % ' ' 

Duplissey :' ' Nothing. 

Mr. B: "Take it out, then." 



Muff: "I saw you in church last Sun- 
day." 

Buff: "I didn't notice you." 
Muff: "I suppose not. You see, I took 
the collection.' Ex. 



Sampson : Is the door to the labora- 
tory unlocked? 

Mr. Bauer: "No, it's open." 



Mr. — (discussing a certain trial 
for an automobile license) : 

All I had to do was to drive around 
the block. 

Ma. — : You didn't have to go to 
'Hamp to do that. You could use your 
head. 



Latin is a dead language, 
It's as dead as it can be; 
It killed the ancient Romans, 
And now it's killing me. 



^iss M. : Where are the Atlas Mts.? 
Utley: In Europe. 
Miss M. : No, south of Europe. 
Utley : Oh, Spain ! 



Father : Why are you always at the 
foot of the class? 

Son : So I may pursue my studies. 



Miss M. (exasperated) : Take the 
front seat, Packard. 

L. P.: But I can't see the girls from 
there. 



Mr. B. : Can you give me the rela- 
tion of the sides of a regular polygon. 
Pupil: Your sides are equal. 



In Civics class Mrs. Warner asked 
for an example of raw material turned 
into finished product in the home as a 
workshop. The astonishing ansAver 
was: "Children." 



Dave Snow, who had just answered 
a question correctly, sighed and 
scratched his head. 

Miss D.: Why. what's the matter? 

Dave: Well, I've made so many 
foolish answers, it's a w^onder that 
one's right. 



32 



THE TATTLER 



The music teacher, leaving her class, 
happened to drop her pitch-pipe. A 
small boy cried : Oh. teacher, you lost 
yonr windpipe. 



]\Irs. W. : What do you want to do. 
Dave S. : I'd like to be a sailor only 
I don't want to scrub the decks. 



H. M. : What are '"heebie-geebies"? 
M. B. : Oh, just the "Avillies. '" 
H. M. : Oh I thought it was something 
that horses have. 



Miss M. : John, recite. 

John Hoxie : I 'm excused. 

Miss M. : Oh no — I said to make it 
np at recess. 

John H. : Well, it ain't recess yet so 
I can't. 



Miss M. : Where's New York City? 
E. Thayer : Opposite us. 
Miss M. : Then you mean on the oth- 
er side of the world? 



Miss M. : What *s the largest river in 
Pennsylvania. 

J. Hoxie : The Potomac. 



Have an accident? 

No, thanks, just had one. 



We have hopes that one of our Soph- 
omores will be a dressmaker as she 
seems to prefer the company of the 
"Tavlor." 



Miss Dunphy: Try that Avord. 

Barbara B. : There's too many i's in 
it. 

Miss Dunphy : You should be able to 
see it more easilv. 



Miss Merrifield: Stop your whispei'- 
ing, Mary. 

M. Black: I wasn't whispering. I 
onlv asked for something. 



We would like to see: 
Dick Bissell groAV up. 
An A in Latin Class once a year. 
Barbara Bisbee thin. 
Alice Nash without M. A. C. souvenirs. 
Olive Rhoades without a marcel. 
Glenn Shaw back at old W. H. S. 
Dick Manwell get to school on time. 
Mac not so free with his pennies. 
One of Bud Foster's "excited ships." 



Ralph, with the air of the man-in-a- 
hurry. asked, "What new records have 
you ? ' ' With nonehalence she replies : 
" 'Smiles' for a half a dollar, 'Kisses' 
for a dollar, and for a dollar and a half 
— "You'd be surprised'!" 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



H. S. PACKARD 



HARDWARE AND GENERAL MERCHANDISE 



WILLIAMSBURG 



MASSACHUSETTS 



Chilson s Aufo Top Shop 

Automobile Trimming-, 
Furniture Upholstering 

We make automobile tops, curtains, 
slip covers, body linings and cushions. 
We specialize on windshield and door 
glass, automobile carpets and lino- 
leums. Prompt service on all work. 
Drive right in — Our Shop holds 12 
cars. 

Phone 1822 34 Center St. 



Bray's Restaurant 

CLEAN, WHOLESOME FOOD 

Home made pastry Quality Do-Nuts 



135 Main Street 



FLORENCE 



MASS. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



Burke & Burdeau 



WILLIAMSBURG 



MASSACHUSETTS 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



F. La VALLEY 



Compliments of 



W. F. TETRO 



R^ J* Richards 

^^ Distinctive Jeweler "^ 



\M\r0 



217 MAIN STREET 



NORTHAMPTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



BISSELL 

"THE TIRE MAN" 
TIRES, VULCANIZING, GASOLINE AND OIL 

FREE AIR 

Hebert Radiator Works 

Radiators Repaired, Recored, Rebuilt 

Bodies, Fenders, Repairing, Welding 

66 KING STREET NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 

STANLEY PADDOCK 
The Tailor 

We do first class steam and dry cleaning 
Pressing and repairing, our specialty 

FLORENCE MASSACHUSETTS 



Compliments of 



The Highland House 



Goshen, Mass. 



J. W. Moran 



Purina 



"THE FEED WITHOUT 
MILL-RUN" 



A. L, HIGGINS 

Phone 55-5 Williamsburo- 



Compliments of 



WILLIAM DEVLIN 



MEATS AND GROCERIES 



Haydenville, 



Mass. 



T. P. LARKIN 



GENERAL MERCHANT 



Phone 8028-2 



Haydenville, Mass. 



Public Liability Insurance 



IN CASE OF AUTOMOBILE ACCIDENT, ENTRUST THE 
CARE AND RESPONSIBILITY OF SETTLEMENT TO A 
GOOD INSURANCE COMPANY. FOR A SMALL YEAR- 
LY PREMIUM WE CAN SAVE YOU A POSSIBLE 
HEAVY FINANCIAL LOSS. 



W. M. PURRINGTON 



General Insurance Agent 



Graves Garage 

Authorized Ford Sales and Service 

WILLIAMSBURG, MASS. 



Let Daniel Outfit You for Graduation 



'' Your Outfit will be CorreEi but ?iot Expensive'' 



HARRY DANIEL 

ASSOCIATES 

NORTHAMPTON, ' MASS. 

Complimemts of 

A. McCALLUM & CO. 

Main Street 
NORTHAMPTON MASSACHUSETTS 



If you are planning your future, open a savings account in this 
Mutual Savings Bank where deposits begin to draw interest month- 
ly. Investigate Savings Bank Life Insurance. Low cost. High re- 
turns. Give us the opportunity to explain it to you. 



NORTHAMPTON INSTITUTION FOR SAVINGS 

hicorponited 1842 



COMPLIMENTS OF 


E. V. DUNPHY 


HAYDEX\^ILLE MASSACHUSETTS 


P. J. Murphy 


Compliments of 


TINNING AND PLUMBING 


Ed^s Lunch 


Hayd'enville, Mass. 




Tel. 113-4 


FLORENCE MASS. 


Frank A. Brandle 

COLLEGE PHARMACY 


W. J. Tremblay 


The Reliable Druggist 


0pp. Academy of Music 
Northampton, Mass. 


Groodwin Block 

131 Main St,, Florence, Mass. 

Tel. 1155 



Compliments of 


WM. J, SHEEHAN & CO. 


HAYDENVILLE MASSACHUSETTS 


Compliments of 


The Haydenville Button Co. 


HAYDENVILLE, MASS. 


The Haydenville House 


Complime'Tits of 


Haydenville, Mass. 




A good Hotel for you to recommend 


C. H. Wheeler, M. D. 


to your friends 




Special Sunday Dinners 


HAYDENA'ILLE MASS. 


KODAK FILM 




PRINTING AND DEVELOPING 


COJIPLIJIEXTS OF 


24 Hour Service 




Haydenville Dairy 
Store 


E. H. Blake 


MOSHER BROS. 

Haydenville ' Mass. 


Haydenville, Mass. 




HUSETTS 




APPLES 



C. H. GOULD 



Haydenville, Mass. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



Nonotuck Savings Bank 



Northampton, Massachusetts 



MERRITT CLARK & CO. 



CLOTHIERS, FURNISHERS, HATTERS 



144 MAIN STREET NORTHAMPTON. MASS. 



E. J. Gare & Son 


Compliments of 


JEWELERS 


I R LAMHIK 

NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 


112 Main Street 
Northampton, Mass. 



Northampton Commercial College 

"THE SCHOOL OF THOROUGHNESS" 

76 Pleasant Street 
Northampton, Massachusetts 



KANE & CONNOR 



DRY GOODS 



139 MAIN ST. 



FLORENCE 



Williamsburg 

Congregational Church 

SUNDAY SERVICES 

Mornino' Worship 10.45 

Church" School 12.00 
Christian Endeavor 7.30 

Mid- Week Meeting 

Thursdays 7.45 

Except during Summer Months 



PLUMB RUBBER STORE 



a^m^^^^s^ma^ 



AN EXCLUSIVE SH(3P FOR 
WOMEN AND MISSES 



NORTHAMPTON, 



MASS. 



Compliments of 

M. L TAYLOR 

Agent for 

Chrysler Cars 



WILLIAMSBURG 



MASS. 



Compliments of 

Williamsburg 

Shoe & Harness 

Shop 

REPAIRING 
Williamsburg 



Mass. 



Compliments of 

Leo Elinsky 

Representing 
Metropolitan Life Ins. Co. 

25 Main St. Northampton, Mass, 

"Not the best because the biggest, the 
biggest because the best 



Charles A. Bisbee 
Tel. Chesterfield 4-2 



Homer R. Bisbee 
Tel. Chesterfield 4-3 



BISBEE BROTHERS 

Dealers in all kinds of 

GRAIN, FEED, FERTILIZERS, SALT, CEMENT AND 

AGRICULTURAL TOOLS 

Bird! & Sons, Roofing Papers 

International Harvester Co. McCormiek Line Harvester Machinery 

ENGINES AND SEPARATORS 
The Chicopee Line of Agricultural Tools Oliver Plows and Cultivators 

A specialty of High Grade Grass Seed 

Get our prices on anything you rieerf before ordering .eUewhene 

Storehouses at Williamsburg and Bisbees, Mass. 

Tel. Williamsburg 60 Williamsburg, Mass., R. F. D. 1 



Compliments of 



C. O. Carlson 



The Williams House 

CHICKEN DINNERS 
A SPECIALTY 

A Good Place To Eat 

H. T. Drake, Prop. 

WILLIAMSBURG MASS. 




MODERN EDUCATION 

Our modern school systems put a lot 
of work upon growing eyes which 
puts a strain upon those with defec- 
tive vision. Latent defects in the eyes 
of children should be carefuly looked 
after. 

A little foresight now may keep them 
from wearing glasses later and will 
help them in their studies. 

Let us examine their eyes 

0. T. DEWHURST 



201 Main St. 
Northampton 



Tel. 184-W 

Mass. 



TAYLOR & MELLEN 


Interior and Exterior Finish 


DIMENSION LUMBER AND FRAMING 


WILLIAMSBURG MASSACHUSETTS 


"The Ledges'' 


Hillcrest Jharm 

Mrs. Clayton Rhoades 


Berkshire Trail 


SINGLE COMB RHODE ISLAND 




REDS 


Q. H. Buckman, Prop. 






Bred to win, lay and pay 


John H. Graham 


ComplimeTifs of 





R. A. WARNER 


COAL AND ICE 


Fresh Milk and Cream 




Delivered Daily 


Telephone Connection 


WILLIAMSBURG MASS. 



COMPLIMENTS OF.. 



P. H. McAVOY 



THE CLARY FARM 

Silas Snow, Proprietor 

ORDERS SOLICITED 

"Apples you can eat in the dark" 



WILLIAMSBURG 



MASSACHUSETTS 



Tel. 12-13 



IeBeau sV^illancourt 

MENs-Outfitters-BOYs 



mas: 



WARREN McAVOY 
Radio Repairing & Accessories 

Williamsburg. Mass. Tel. 33-3 

ComplimenU of 

T. M. WELLS 



C. F. JENKINS 



STATIONERY, MEDICINES, GREETING CARDS AND 

ICE CREAM 



WILLIAMSBURG 



MASSACHUSETTS 



Williamsburg Garage 

AUTO REPAIRING 
ACCESSORIES 

Try our new No-Nox Motor Fuel 


COMPLIMENTS OF 

J. G.Hayes, M.I). 


CompUmenfs of 

A. J. Polmatier &- Son 

MEAT, GROCERIES, FRUIT AND VEGETABLES 

Telephone 68-3 
WILLIAMSBURG MASSACHUSETTS 


Maple Crest Stock Farm 

FANCY APPLES 

SWINE MILK AND HOT-HOUSE LAMBS 

Williamsburg, Mass. Sereno S. Clark, Prop. 


South Bend Orchards 

R. I. R. POULTRY 
FRUIT AND VEGETABLES 

Delivered or at the farm 


UNQUOMONK FARMS 


RETAIL MILK & CREAM 


FRUIT, Vegetables, TOBACCO 
E. R. Sylvester 


S. ELLIS CLARK, Prop. 
Williamsburg 



HILL BROS. 



DRY GOODS 



118 Main Street 
NORTHAMPTON MASS. 



Piercers Paint Store 



PAINT 

WALL PAPER 
GLASS, ETC. 

PAINT SUPPLIES 

186 Main St.— Tel. 1207 

Northampton Mass. 



The "E & J" Cigar Co. 



MANUFACTURERS OF CIGARS 



^'E. & J's" and Fenbros 



WHOLESALERS OF CIGARS, CIGARETTES, TOBACCO 



23 Main St. 
Northampton, Mass. 




Tel. 815-M 



J. A. SULLIVAN & CO. 

Northampton, Mass. 

Dealers in Hardware, Houseware, Farm Machinery, 

Radio, Sporting Goods, Roofing, Paint, 

Building Material. 



Compliments 



of 



The Class of 1926 



Baseball 

Baseball and Tennis Goods 

Spalding & Draper — Maynard 



T. A. PURSEGLOVE 



Northampton 



Mass. 



Compliments of 



COBURN & GRAVES 



Opposite Court House 



Northampton 



Mass. 



ws^^^^minmi . uf 



1797 



BRIDGMAN & LYMAN 

BOOKS AND STATIONERY 
FOUNTAIN PENS 

108 Main Street 



1926 



NORTHAMPTON 



MASSACHUSETTS 



Compliments of 



J. J. Moriarty 

FURNITURE 



Northampton, 



Mass. 



W. L CHILSON 

Trunks, Bags, and Leather Goods 
Mittens & Gloves 



Twenty-three years on Main Street, 
now in Odd Fellows Building 



28 Center Street 
Northampton 



Mass. 



A. H. RHODES 

Goshen-.Di4/Lr EXPRESS-^ ovthampton 

hiocal and Long Distance Moving 



TEL— WILLIAMSBUEG— 18-15